H5F: Sidney Blumenthal – A Self-Made Man: The Political Life of Abraham Lincoln

May 27, 2016 –  It’s History in Five Friday, presented by Simon & Schuster — check them out at Facebook.com/HistoryInFive. While it’s no secret that Abraham Lincoln didn’t have an idyllic childhood, today’s guest — journalist and political aide Sidney Blumenthal — noticed something in particular about young Lincoln’s experience that might have impacted the way he perceived and spoke about slavery. Blumenthal is the author of the book, A Self-Made Man: The Political Life of Abraham Lincoln, 1809-1849. Simon & Schuster’s History in Five Friday. It’s the perfect way to kick off your modern weekend…with people, from the past. Podcast: Download (Duration: 2:38 — 2.4MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Google Podcasts | RSS | More

Feather Foster — Mary Lincoln’s Flannel Pajamas
American Presidents / May 9, 2016

May 9, 2016 – In this episode, our time machine door opens into the wardrobe of our First Ladies, that Narnia of fashion that trends back to the very first days of our republic, when the role of the president’s wife had — like the role of the president himself — yet to be defined. Our valet is Feather Schwartz Foster, a presidential historian who focuses on our First Ladies from Martha Washington to Mamie Eisenhower. She’s here to share fun and little known stories from her new book: Mary Lincoln’s Flannel Pajamas: And Other Stories from the First Ladies’ Closet. You can find her @FeatherSFoster on Twitter, or at FeatherFoster.com, where you can sample a free chapter from today’s book. Also discussed in today’s episode, a sneak peek at our summertime read: Remarkable Women of the New Jersey Shore: Clam Shuckers, Social Reformers and Summer Sojourners.       Podcast: Download (Duration: 50:16 — 46.0MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Google Podcasts | RSS | More

Daniel L. Mallock – Agony and Eloquence
American Presidents / April 25, 2016

April 25, 2016 – In this episode, we’ll step through the Guardian of Forever and meet two founding fathers who were best friends, then bitter enemies, and finally friends again: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, the second and third presidents of the United States, and the first and second vice presidents. Our guide on this journey is Daniel L. Mallock, and his book is Agony and Eloquence: John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and a World of Revolution. Daniel L. Mallock grew up within walking distance of Peacefield, John and Abigail Adams’ home in Massachusetts, and was also a member of the Quincy Historical Society in the Bay State. You may have seen his previous history work in North and South. But if not, check out his website: DanielMallock.com. And if you’re going to be in the New England area this summer, catch Dan at Bunker Hill Day, June 17, 2016, where he’ll speak about “John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and the Other Revolution” at the Adams National Historic Park in Quincy, Massachusetts.     Podcast: Download (Duration: 58:10 — 53.3MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Google Podcasts | RSS | More

H5F: Fergus Bordewich – The First Congress

April 15, 2016 – It’s History in Five Friday, presented by Simon & Schuster. Our guest is Fergus Bordewich , and his book is, The First Congress: How James Madison, George Washington, and a Group of Extraordinary Men Invented the Government. It’s the monumental story of the most productive Congress in US history, in 1789–1791, which we first explored with Fergus in our recent interview, which you can still find at HistoryAuthor.com, iTunes, iHeartRadio, or wherever you’re listening. Mr. Fergus Bordewich is the author of six previous books including, America’s Great Debate — Henry Clay, Stephen A. Douglas, and The Compromise that Preserved the Union, Washington: The Making of the American Capital, and Bound for Canaan: The Underground Railroad and the War for the Soul of America. You learn more about these and his other titles at FergusBordewich.com. Simon & Schuster’s History in Five Friday. It’s the perfect way to kick off your modern weekend…with people from the past. Podcast: Download (Duration: 4:09 — 3.8MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Google Podcasts | RSS | More

Fergus Bordewich – The First Congress
American Presidents / April 4, 2016

April 4, 2016 – Today, our time machine is whisking us back to the very earliest days of America’s republic. Our guest is Fergus Bordewich , and his book is, The First Congress: How James Madison, George Washington, and a Group of Extraordinary Men Invented the Government. It’s the untold story of the most productive Congress in US history, in 1789–1791. Mr. Fergus Bordewich is the author of six previous books including, America’s Great Debate — Henry Clay, Stephen A. Douglas, and The Compromise that Preserved the Union, Washington: The Making of the American Capital, and Bound for Canaan: The Underground Railroad and the War for the Soul of America. You learn more about these and his other titles at FergusBordewich.com.           Podcast: Download (Duration: 48:53 — 44.8MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Google Podcasts | RSS | More

Don Glickstein – After Yorktown
American Presidents / March 21, 2016

March 21, 2016 – Today, we time-travel back to the times after the times that tried men’s souls. The date is October 19, 1781, and a combined French and rebel force defeats the Redcoats at the Battle of Yorktown, Virginia. But contrary to two centuries of grade school and academic histories, the war for independence didn’t end with the surrender of General Cornwallis’s sword. The fighting dragged on for men like George Washington, Horatio Nelson, Lafayette, and Hyder Ali. This was a world war, with fighting from the Caribbean to the Mediterranean, and the Arctic to the coast of Sri Lanka. We learn about the men who kept fighting in Don Glickstein’s debut book, After Yorktown: The Final Struggle for American Independence.  We also mentioned Fergus Bordewich’s book, The First Congress: How James Madison, George Washington, and a Group of Extraordinary Men Invented the Government.   Podcast: Download (Duration: 53:33 — 49.0MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Google Podcasts | RSS | More

Paul Kahan – The Bank War
American Presidents / February 22, 2016

February 22, 2016 – This week, we sling-shot around the sun at high warp, sending us tumbling back in time to the Summer of 1832 — and America, at war. It’s not a conflict over land or of arms, but over the fiscal system of the young republic. Our guide on this journey is Paul Kahan, and his book is The Bank War: Andrew Jackson, Nicholas Biddle, and the Fight for American Finance. The fight against the Second Bank of the United States may have been the most frustrating fight of President Jackson’s life, since — for once — he couldn’t end things by simply shooting or threatening to shoot his opponent in the face. Dr. Kahan holds a Ph.D. in U.S. history from Temple University, an M.A. in Modern American History & Literature, and B.A.s in history and English. He’s also the author of two books on Philadelphia’s Eastern State Penitentiary, and another titled, The Homestead Strike: Labor, Violence, and American History Critical Moments in American Industry. You can visit him at PaulKahan.com, or follow him on Twitter @Paul_Kahan.     Podcast: Download (Duration: 49:46 — 45.6MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Google Podcasts | RSS | More

T.H. Breen – George Washington’s Journey
American Presidents / February 8, 2016

February 8, 2016 – Today, we’re riding in Great White Coach with the father of our country. Our teamster is author Timothy Hall Breen, and his book is George Washington’s Journey: The President Forges a New Nation. Aware of the fragile and fractured nature of the new republic after independence, Washington resolves — in a day without maps or roads worthy of the name — to take the federal government to the people. Staying in simple inns rather than fine houses, and suffering through terrible food and bad treatment for his horses, Washington visited every one of the thirteen states, and left a candid assessment of his opinions, as well as funny moments with the people — and a few where he nearly died. Mr. Breen is the James Marsh Professor at-large at the University of Vermont and the author of eleven books on American history including, The Marketplace of Revolution: How Consumer Politics Shaped American Independence.  You can follow him @TimothyHBreen on Twitter.       Podcast: Download (Duration: 39:13 — 35.9MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Google Podcasts | RSS | More

John J. Miller – The Big Scrum: How Teddy Roosevelt Saved Football
American Presidents / February 1, 2016

February 1, 2016 – An advocate of the strenuous life, President Theodore Roosevelt saw sports as essential to developing physical fitness and character. So when 18 players died playing football in 1905, and people called to ban the game, TR leaped into action to reform the pigskin pastime. The game in those days resembled rugby much more than the game the Denver Broncos and Carolina Panthers will play in Super Bowl 50. Joining us to discuss how we got from a time no forward pass, neutral zone or pads to the present day, is John J. Miller. His book is titled, The Big Scrum: How Teddy Roosevelt Saved Football. John J. Miller is a correspondent for National Review, contributor to the Wall Street Journal, and author of four books including a novel, The First Assassin, and the non-fiction offering: Our Oldest Enemy — A history of America’s Disastrous Relationship with France. He’s also director of the Dow Journalism Program at Hillsdale College — and a proud fan of his college team, the Michigan University Wolverines. You can follow him on Twitter @HeyMiller, like him at Facebook.com/HeyMiller, or visit him at HeyMiller.com. He also hosts a podcast you’ll want to check out if…

H5F: Ulysses S. Grant
American Presidents , History in Five / January 15, 2016

January 15, 2016 – Today’s history author, Jean Edward Smith, author of Grant, discusses the life and legacy of Ulysses S. Grant, from great disappointments and outright failures, to Civil War battlefields and, ultimately, the White House. The book bears a single word, the name of a modest man who became a legend. Grant.  Frederick Douglas called him “the last of the radicals” and he wrote memoirs so beautiful that critics have called them some of the most beautiful works in the English language. In this week’s episode, Jean Edward Smith shares with us five things you need to know about General Grant. History in Five Friday. It’s the perfect way to kick off your modern weekend… with people from the past. Podcast: Download (Duration: 4:13 — 3.9MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Google Podcasts | RSS | More