Kim MacQuarrie – Life and Death in the Andes
Exploration / January 18, 2016

January 18, 2016 – This week, we’re flying our time machine across the Equator and into South America’s turbulent past, where we’ll meet some colorful characters, present at key moments of its history. They include Pablo Escobar, Butch Cassidy, Sundance, Charles Darwin, and a 14-year-old girl, Juanita, who the Incas sacrificed atop a twenty-thousand foot volcano. Our tour guide to the Andes is author and filmmaker Kim MacQuarrie, who has won four Emmys for his documentaries. His latest book is Life and Death in the Andes: On the Trail of Bandits, Heroes, and Revolutionaries. You can follow him @KimMacQ on Twitter, and learn more about his work at KimMacQuarrie.com. The F/X channel is developing Kim’s previous book, The Last Days of the Incas, into a 13-part TV series: Conquistadors. Other books we discuss include Candice Millard’s epic Amazon history: The River of Doubt: Theodore Roosevelt’s Darkest Journey.       Podcast: Download (Duration: 37:55 — 34.7MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Google Podcasts | RSS | More

Eric Weiner – Geography of Genius
Exploration / January 4, 2016

January 4, 2016 – In this episode, we’re racing the time machine through a bunch of stops around the world and throughout history. Our ticket is The Geography of Genius: A Search for the World’s Most Creative Places from Ancient Athens to Silicon Valley. We’ll be guided along the way by Eric Weiner, author of the New York Times bestseller The Geography of Bliss, as well as the critically acclaimed Man Seeks God. And along the way, we’ll answer the question that’s on the minds of every Loony Toons fan: “Was Wile E. Coyote a genius or not?” You can sleuth out more about him @Eric_Weiner on Twitter, or at EricWeinerBooks.com. Podcast: Download ()Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Google Podcasts | RSS | More

H5F: David McCullough – The Wright Brothers
Exploration , History in Five / October 9, 2015

October 9, 2015 – It’s History in Five Friday, presented by Simon & Schuster — kicking off your modern weekend, with people from the past.  Today, we offer up legendary history author David McCullough on his latest #1 New York Times best-seller: The Wright Brothers. It’s a tale that Mr. McCullough calls quintessentially American in its power to inspire, and to set an example for us in 2015. Orville and Wilbur Wright — along with their impressive sister Katharine — showed the world that man could fly, changing that world forever. And they did it all for just a thousand bucks.   Additional books discussed in this episode:           Podcast: Download (Duration: 8:01 — 7.3MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Google Podcasts | RSS | More

Rinker Buck – The Oregon Trail
Exploration / August 9, 2015

August 10, 2015 – Three mules, two brothers, and a Jack Russell terrier. Together they rattle 2000 miles from Missouri to the great American Northwest in a covered wagon. That isn’t the setup for a Vaudeville joke, but there are plenty of laughs found on the ruts, roads and interstates. That’s right, interstates. The trip doesn’t take place before the Civil War, but in our time. We can go along for the ride from the comfort of our reading chairs thanks to author Rinker Buck’s New York Times best-seller: The Oregon Trail: A New American Journey. It’s the first such crossing in a century, which meant our unlikely group of pioneers had to reinvent the lost art of wagon travel along the way. Mr. Buck grew up on the family farm in historic Morristown, New Jersey, and attended Bowdoin College in Maine. His career in journalism earned him the Eugene S. Pulliam Journalism Writing Award and other accolades. In his 1997 book, Flight of Passage, he shared another adventure: Piloting a Piper PA-11 across the United States in 1966. Just 15 at the time, he became the youngest airmen ever to complete the trip. You can follow his continuing adventures…