January 16, 2017 – This week, our time machine travels back to one of the past’s darkest corners, to meet Victor Capesius. Before the war, he was a friendly neighborhood druggist in Romania. But as World War Two progressed, this ethnic German rose from anonymity, to infamy, standing at the side of Dr. Josef Mengele, The Angel of Death. Patricia Posner brings us the true tale of this Nazi SS officer in, The Pharmacist of Auschwitz: ...

January 9, 2017 – This week, our time machine whisks us back the Pan-American Exposition, a Gilded Age world’s fair powered by the newly harnessed power of electricity. “The Pan” covered 350 acres near Niagara Falls, and heralded the wonders of the 20th Century. But it also featured lingering stereotypes of a pre-flight world, and the tragic assassination of President William McKinley — America’s most belove...

January 2, 2017 – Hello, Happy New Year! This week, our time machine turns tower crane, as best-selling author and historian Hugh Howard introduces us to two men whose vision for building shaped the 20th Century. His book is, Architecture’s Odd Couple: Frank Lloyd Wright and Philip Johnson. Conducting the interview is Thriller author and practicing architect Tom Grace, who previously interviewed Gerald Posner, author of God’s...

December 21, 2016 – We’re uploading our Monday, December 26, 2016, episode a little bit ahead of schedule — call it an early Christmas gift. Our guest is Peter Lion, who brings us The American St. Nick: A True Story. It’s the unique tail of a World War Two G.I., who ended up playing a big role in tiny Luxembourg. In the lull between the Nazi withdrawal and the Battle of the Bulge, Corporal Richard Brookins helped bring ...

December 19, 2016 – This week, our time machine swerves Into the Past Lane. Our guest is, Edward T. O’Donnell, host of the Into the Past Lane podcast and author of Henry George and the Crisis of Inequality: Progress and Poverty in the Gilded Age. You may not know who Henry George is, but his ideas swirled around the campaign for president throughout the recent election, and his approach to solving political and economic problems ar...

December 12, 2016 – This week, our time machine goes looking for America on the New Jersey Turnpike, and finds it at the birthplace of Ben Franklin, the Constitution, and cheesesteaks. We previously visited the City of Brotherly Love for our interview at McGillin’s Olde Ale House est. 1860 and Dr. Mütter’s Marvels, with side trips to check out the Paoli Battlefield and to meet Simon Cameron, “Lincoln’s Scandalous ...

December 5, 2016 – In this episode we meet 103-year-old Lt. Jim Downing, the second-oldest survivor of the Pearl Harbor attack, who will speak at the 75th commemoration in Hawaii on December 7th, 2016. Jim not only witnessed his ship, USS West Virginia, go up in flames on that day of infamy, but he later served in the Korean War, and in 1956 stumbled into the H-Bomb test at Bikini Atoll. A man of great faith and soon to be the oldest mal...

November 28, 2016 – This week, our time machine touches down during Adolf Hitler’s reign in Germany, to answer a big question: How? How did this failed Austrian painter — a little-noticed corporal in the Great War — persuade the German people in droves to follow him into the abyss of total war? The usual answers are charisma and a ruthless stamping out of domestic dissent. But here on the History author show, we always ...

November 21, 2016 – The Flushing Remonstrance of 1657, a precursor to our own First Amendment protections of religious liberty. The Spaldeen we discussed in Geoff Griffin’s Brooklyn Bat Boy: A Story of the 1947 Season that Changed Baseball Forever. This week, New York Times Urban Affairs Correspondent Sam Roberts puts some serious miles on our Time Machine, and fills its trunk with the everyday objects that defined Gotham since it&...

November 14, 2016 – This week, our time machine may sound like it’s taking a sideways journey into the fictional world of Harper Lee’s iconic book, To Kill a Mockingbird. We touch down in 1930’s Alabama, and find a small town rocked when a black man is charged with raping a white woman. Only one local lawyer dares to defend the accused. That man was Foster Beck, and his son, Joseph Madison Beck, joins us to tell this ee...

EPISODES

Patricia Posner – The Pharmacist of Auschwitz: The Untold Story

January 16, 2017 – This week, our time machine travels back to one of the past’s darkest corners, to meet Victor Capesius. Before the war, he was a friendly neighborhood druggist in Romania. But as World War Two progressed, this ethnic German rose from anonymity, to infamy, standing at the side of Dr. Josef Mengele, The Angel of Death. Patricia Posner brings us the true tale of this Nazi SS officer in, The Pharmacist of A...

Margaret Creighton – The Electrifying Fall of Rainbow City: Spectacle and Assassination at the 1901 World’s Fair

January 9, 2017 – This week, our time machine whisks us back the Pan-American Exposition, a Gilded Age world’s fair powered by the newly harnessed power of electricity. “The Pan” covered 350 acres near Niagara Falls, and heralded the wonders of the 20th Century. But it also featured lingering stereotypes of a pre-flight world, and the tragic assassination of President William McKinley — America’s m...

Hugh Howard – Architecture’s Odd Couple: Frank Lloyd Wright and Philip Johnson

January 2, 2017 – Hello, Happy New Year! This week, our time machine turns tower crane, as best-selling author and historian Hugh Howard introduces us to two men whose vision for building shaped the 20th Century. His book is, Architecture’s Odd Couple: Frank Lloyd Wright and Philip Johnson. Conducting the interview is Thriller author and practicing architect Tom Grace, who previously interviewed Gerald Posner, author of G...

Peter Lion – The American St. Nick: A True Story

December 21, 2016 – We’re uploading our Monday, December 26, 2016, episode a little bit ahead of schedule — call it an early Christmas gift. Our guest is Peter Lion, who brings us The American St. Nick: A True Story. It’s the unique tail of a World War Two G.I., who ended up playing a big role in tiny Luxembourg. In the lull between the Nazi withdrawal and the Battle of the Bulge, Corporal Richard Brookins hel...

Edward T. O’Donnell – Henry George and the Crisis of Inequality: Progress and Poverty in the Gilded Age

December 19, 2016 – This week, our time machine swerves Into the Past Lane. Our guest is, Edward T. O’Donnell, host of the Into the Past Lane podcast and author of Henry George and the Crisis of Inequality: Progress and Poverty in the Gilded Age. You may not know who Henry George is, but his ideas swirled around the campaign for president throughout the recent election, and his approach to solving political and economic p...

Irene Levy Baker – 100 Things to Do in Philadelphia Before You Die

December 12, 2016 – This week, our time machine goes looking for America on the New Jersey Turnpike, and finds it at the birthplace of Ben Franklin, the Constitution, and cheesesteaks. We previously visited the City of Brotherly Love for our interview at McGillin’s Olde Ale House est. 1860 and Dr. Mütter’s Marvels, with side trips to check out the Paoli Battlefield and to meet Simon Cameron, “Lincoln’s S...

Lt. Jim Downing – The Other Side of Infamy: My Journey Through Pearl Harbor and the World of War

December 5, 2016 – In this episode we meet 103-year-old Lt. Jim Downing, the second-oldest survivor of the Pearl Harbor attack, who will speak at the 75th commemoration in Hawaii on December 7th, 2016. Jim not only witnessed his ship, USS West Virginia, go up in flames on that day of infamy, but he later served in the Korean War, and in 1956 stumbled into the H-Bomb test at Bikini Atoll. A man of great faith and soon to be the ...

Nathan Stoltzfus – Hitler’s Compromises: Coercion and Consensus in Nazi Germany

November 28, 2016 – This week, our time machine touches down during Adolf Hitler’s reign in Germany, to answer a big question: How? How did this failed Austrian painter — a little-noticed corporal in the Great War — persuade the German people in droves to follow him into the abyss of total war? The usual answers are charisma and a ruthless stamping out of domestic dissent. But here on the History author show, ...

Sam Roberts – A History of New York in 101 Objects

November 21, 2016 – The Flushing Remonstrance of 1657, a precursor to our own First Amendment protections of religious liberty. The Spaldeen we discussed in Geoff Griffin’s Brooklyn Bat Boy: A Story of the 1947 Season that Changed Baseball Forever. This week, New York Times Urban Affairs Correspondent Sam Roberts puts some serious miles on our Time Machine, and fills its trunk with the everyday objects that defined Gotham...

Joseph Madison Beck – My Father and Atticus Finch: A Lawyer’s Fight for Justice in 1930s Alabama

November 14, 2016 – This week, our time machine may sound like it’s taking a sideways journey into the fictional world of Harper Lee’s iconic book, To Kill a Mockingbird. We touch down in 1930’s Alabama, and find a small town rocked when a black man is charged with raping a white woman. Only one local lawyer dares to defend the accused. That man was Foster Beck, and his son, Joseph Madison Beck, joins us to te...