April 23, 2018 – Our time machine travels back 100 years, to witness the split-second explosion that blew a chunk of Halifax, Nova Scotia off the map. On December 6, 1917, this key city in supplying the Allies in the Great War, suffered the largest man-made explosion prior to the bombs that ended World War Two — something that caught the attention of physicist Robert Oppenheimer, the “father of the atomic bomb.” On the ...

April 9, 2018 – Our time machine travels back to 1931 to conclude the Durant Family Trilogy. Moving on from the Gilded Age, we’ll catch up with William and Ella, the adult children of Union Pacific Railroad tycoon Dr. Thomas C. Durant, in the final years of their complicated lives. Our guest, Sheila Myers, first introduced us to the family in her novel, Imaginary Brightness, as they had their comfortable lives in London shattered b...

March 26, 2018 – It’s a special episode, recorded live on the campus of New York University at the Joint Journalism and Communication History Conference, co-sponsored by the American Journalism Historians Association and the History Division of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication. The spot at No. 20 Bowery is in sight of the Cooper Union where Abraham Lincoln gave the 1860 speech that launched him int...

March 12, 2018 – Our time machine travels back to the Philippines during the Japanese occupation the Second World War. Once in the South Pacific, we’ll bear solemn witness to crimes against women who have been denied the justice and compensation for the atrocities they suffered in the name of the emperor. Our guide on this journey is M. Evelina Galang who brings us Lolas’ House: Filipino Women Living with War. The Imperial Ja...

February 26, 2018 – Our time machine travels to 1960 and pulls over at a secluded bridge on a lonely Colorado road. We’re there to witness a crime of greed and envy, when a bitter escaped convict with delusions of high IQ snatches the 44-year-old CEO of Coors as he makes his way to the family brewery. We follow this tale of true crime in the new book: The Death of an Heir: Adolph Coors III and the Murder That Rocked an American Bre...

February 12, 2018 – For Black History Month, our time machine piles readers 4 to 8 years old into their car seats, and introduces them to a hero who overcame segregation and many other obstacles, to pursue his artistic dream — and that’s after being a star NFL player. Returning to the show is Sandra Neil Wallace, who last joined us with her husband and co-writer Rich Wallace to discuss their books Bound by Ice: A True North P...

January 29, 2018 – Our time machine heads south to the other land down under for a chilly Jazz Age adventure. Our guide on this journey is Laurie Gwen Shapiro who brings us the story of a scrappy Polish-American kid from Manhattan’s Lower East Side, who explores the Roaring ’20s final frontier. Her book is The Stowaway: A Young Man’s Extraordinary Adventure to Antarctica. It’s the spectacular, true story of Billy Gawron...

January 15, 2018 – Our time machine travels back to the Union-occupied city of Alexandria, Virginia, to get an abolitionist woman’s perspective during America’s Civil War. Our guide on this journey is Paula Tarnapol Whitaker, author of A Civil Life in an Uncivil Time: Julia Wilbur’s Struggle for Purpose. Paula met up with us in Virginia at the Lyceum, Alexandria’s History Museum, where we felt close to this woman ...

January 1, 2018 – Happy New Year, history lovers! To kick off 2018, we welcome thriller author Tom Grace to discuss the sixth novel in his series featuring ex-Navy SEAL Nolan Kilkenny: Undeniable. Tom’s novels feature cutting-edge technology, and we discuss how DNA science is solving historical mysteries. Did Adolf Hitler have a son? Was Warren G. Harding our first black president? What sinister uses will criminal minds cook up whe...

December 25, 2017 – This week, our time machine visits 1939, clicks on the radio, and listens to The Campbell Playhouse production of A Christmas Carol hosted by Orson Welles and staring Lionel Barrymore as Ebenezer Scrooge. When Charles Dickens published the story in 1843, he did so as what we’d call social commentary, reflecting the soul-searching of his fellow Britons about the true meaning of Christmas. Even 175 years later, we...

EPISODES

Laini Giles – The Forgotten Flapper

January 11, 2016 – In this episode, we’re going to Charleston our way back to the Manhattan of our theme song, New York Ain’t New York Anymore. Yes, it’s the Jazz Age of speakeasies and Prohibition — and our tour guide is none other than the Theater Districts most famous resident ghost, sighted from time to time in the New Amsterdam Theater. Our guest, author Laini Giles, has written our ticket to one of...

H5F: How FDR Defied Polio

January 8, 2016 – Today, James Tobin — winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award in biography — shares one of the greatest stories of defiance and overcoming infirmity in: The Man He Became: How FDR Defied Polio to Win the Presidency. When polio robbed Franklin Delano Roosevelt of his legs at age 39, the conventional wisdom agreed that his political career was over. Certainly nobody thought he’d rise to...

CWW: Aristotle and the Art of Friendship

January 6, 2016 – It’s Classical Wisdom Wednesday, presented by Classical Wisdom Weekly — bringing ancient wisdom to modern minds, every Wednesday morning before your first cup of coffee. Let me ask you something. How many friends do you have? Are they REALLY your friends? Is it possible that your friends are using you for utility or pleasure. If you’ve never thought of these things, then don’t worry. Aristotle certainly did. Y...

Eric Weiner – Geography of Genius

January 4, 2016 – In this episode, we’re racing the time machine through a bunch of stops around the world and throughout history. Our ticket is The Geography of Genius: A Search for the World’s Most Creative Places from Ancient Athens to Silicon Valley. We’ll be guided along the way by Eric Weiner, author of the New York Times bestseller The Geography of Bliss, as well as the critically acclaimed Man Seeks Go...

CWW: The Ark of Deucalion

December 30, 2015 – It’s Classical Wisdom Wednesday, presented by Classical Wisdom Weekly — bringing ancient wisdom to modern minds, every Wednesday morning before your first cup of coffee. Today, we are going to discuss creation myths. See if you can guess this man: after being warned about a deadly flood, he builds a mighty ark and escapes the ensuing deluge. If you guessed the biblical Noah, then you are only half wrong. Lis...

Stephen F. Knott – Washington and Hamilton

December 28, 2015 – Today, we’re joined by Stephen F. Knott, who along with co-author Tony Williams brings us Washington & Hamilton: The Alliance that Forged America. George Washington and Alexander Hamilton’s relationship has gotten renewed attention since the smash Broadway musical, ending almost 200 years of being overlooked. From the early days of the Revolutionary War on the hills of Rutgers University R...

Amanda Read – Why December 25th for Christmas?

December 25, 2015 – Traditionally, December 25th has been celebrated as the birthday of Jesus Christ. But a variety of historic factors and scholarly discoveries indicate that He was not actually born on that date. Since this isn’t really news, just how did most of the Christian world settle on this date for the big celebration? Amanda Read digs deep into the reason for the season in a special episode brought to you by Lu...

CWW: The Battle of Arginusae

December 23, 2015 – It’s Classical Wisdom Wednesday, presented by Classical Wisdom Weekly — bringing ancient wisdom to modern minds, every Wednesday morning before your first cup of coffee. Today, we are going to relive one of the most epic sea battles from the classical world. It was, at the time, the largest sea battle to every take place between ancient navies. It was the battle of Arginusae. Your guide through the classical...

Barry Strauss – The Death of Caesar

December 21, 2015 – Today we sit down with Barry Strauss, professor of history and classics at Cornell University. A leading expert on ancient military history who counts Mel Brooks as his greatest living inspiration, he has written or edited several books, including The Battle of Salamis, The Trojan War, and The Spartacus War. Visit him @BarryStrauss on Twitter or at BarryStrauss.com. Podcast: Download (Duration: 35:10 —...

H5F: Barry Strauss, Why Murder Caesar?

December 18, 2015 – Today, author Barry Strauss explores the political, military, and social motivations behind history’s most famous murder. Mr. Strauss is professor of history and classics at Cornell University, and a leading expert on ancient military history. Visit him @BarryStrauss on Twitter or at BarryStrauss.com. And don’t miss our full interview on his book, The Death of Caesar, when we upload it on December 21, ...