McGillin’s Olde Ale House, Chris Mullins, Sr.
Food /

December 14, 2015 – Ma and Pa McGillin opened the door to their home in 1860, when Abraham Lincoln won the presidency and just after the Liberty Bell cracked. As the decades passed, their tavern endured, tucked away in an alley, as if hiding from old Father Time. Originally called The Bell in Hand, McGillin’s has survived wars, economic panics, challenges from upstart chain restaurants and <shudder> Prohibition. Visit McGillins.com to do some serious time traveling with dozens of news articles, follow the tavern @McGillins on Twitter or like it at Facebook.com/McGillins. And plan to pull up a stool as we spend an afternoon in the City of Brotherly Love, 1860 style… Podcast: Download (Duration: 36:11 — 33.1MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

The Old ’76 House, Robert Norden

November 23, 2015 – The Old ’76 House in Tappan, New York, is a National Landmark, one where you can eat a meal fit for overthrowing a king. The building itself predates the American Revolution by over a century, and served an active role in the fight for independence. Every major figure including General George Washington spent time at this great American tavern. In 1780, it even served as a make-shift prison for Major John Andre, the British spy caught conspiring with America’s most infamous traitor, Benedict Arnold. And it was here that the British met Gen. Washington to officially recognize the war’s end, and recognize America as a free and independent nation. Learn more about America’s oldest tavern at 76House.com, or by following them at Facebook.com/TheOld76House. And don’t miss our interview with tavernkeeper, Robert Norden, who restored and preserves this unique piece of American history. Podcast: Download (Duration: 39:28 — 36.1MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

Dan DeMiglio from Callahan’s Hot Dogs
Food /

September 7, 2015 – This journey into the past is our tastiest yet. Our guest is Dan DeMiglio, heir to a legendary Callahan’s hot dog shop, a landmark in Fort Lee, New Jersey, just across the George Washington Bridge. Our goal is to do more than books here on the program, to remind people that we’re all the author of our own chapter in the great human story, so Callahan’s — which closed in 2006 after fifty years serving the “so big, so good” beset, seemed like a natural. In 1950, Leonard “Artie” Castrianni didn’t know it, but he was writing history — not with ink, but with ketchup and mustard. The story began when he opened a road-side food stand and gas station on the Palisades cliffs. From it, he served deep-fried hot dogs, hand-cut fries, Birch Beer and more to hungry families — first from the nearby Palisades Amusement Park, and later to anyone who wanted a taste of the past. Callahan’s was an institution in Fort Lee, and from age 7, Daniel DeMiglio — Artie Castrianni’s grandson — had a single goal in life: To carry on the family legacy. Even when his dad and uncle sold…