Laurie Gwen Shapiro – The Stowaway: A Young Man’s Extraordinary Adventure to Antarctica
Exploration / January 29, 2018

January 29, 2018 – Our time machine heads south to the other land down under for a chilly Jazz Age adventure. Our guide on this journey is Laurie Gwen Shapiro who brings us the story of a scrappy Polish-American kid from Manhattan’s Lower East Side, who explores the Roaring ’20s final frontier. Her book is The Stowaway: A Young Man’s Extraordinary Adventure to Antarctica. It’s the spectacular, true story of Billy Gawronski who snuck onto the flagship of famed explorer Richard E. Byrd, demanding a place among the crew and on the pages of history. Laurie Gwen Shapiro is a native of Billy Gawronski’s corner of Manhattan, and you’ve seen her writing in New York Magazine, Slate, Los Angeles Review of Books, as well as in her history column The Forward, focusing on unsung heroes. She is also a documentary filmmaker who won an Independent Spirit Award for directing IFC’s Keep the River on Your Right: A Modern Cannibal Tale and an Emmy nomination for producing HBO’s Finishing Heaven. Visit her online at LaurieGwenShapiro.com, follow her @LaurieStories on Twitter and Instagram, or toss a like to Facebook.com/LaurieGwenShapiro.       Podcast: Download (Duration: 55:51 — 127.8MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android…

Paula Tarnapol Whitacre – A Civil Life in an Uncivil Time
Civil War / January 15, 2018

January 15, 2018 – Our time machine travels back to the Union-occupied city of Alexandria, Virginia, to get an abolitionist woman’s perspective during America’s Civil War. Our guide on this journey is Paula Tarnapol Whitaker, author of A Civil Life in an Uncivil Time: Julia Wilbur’s Struggle for Purpose. Paula met up with us in Virginia at the Lyceum, Alexandria’s History Museum, where we felt close to this woman ahead of her time. In the fall of 1862, with the Civil War raging, 47-year-old Julia Wilbur said goodbye to the family farm near Rochester, New York, and boarded a train to the capital of a divided nation. An ardent abolitionist, Wilbur spent most of the next several years in Alexandria, Virginia, just across the river from Washington, D.C. Pushing back against the limitations women faced at the time, Julia Wilbur aided escaped slaves and hospitalized Union soldiers, later serving in the Freedman’s bureau as African-Americans made their first steps to full citizenship. Based on diaries, letters, and other primary sources, A Civil Life in an Uncivil Time introduces us to a woman who threw herself into a changing society, and helped bend it in the direction of liberty. You can…