Rafe Bartholomew – Two and Two: McSorley’s, My Dad, and Me

June 26, 2017 – This week, our time machine visits New York City’s oldest bar, McSorley’s Old Ale House. Our theme song, “New York Ain’t New York Anymore,” laments the loss of places where “the sawdust is gone from the floor.” Well in this East Village landmark, where the clock has literally stopped, and that means still spreading the sawdust every morning — and that they refused to admit women until a federal court forced them to in 1970 (or build them their own bathroom until 1986). Founded in 1854 by John McSorley and carried on by his son Bill, this saloon serves only two kinds of ale — light or dark — and always by the pair. Our guest this week, author Rafe Bartholomew, grew up in the bar like Old Bill before him. Rafe’s father is Geoffrey “Bart” Bartholomew, who has spent half a century behind the taps and had thousands of New York Moments, from serving the New York Rangers ale out of the Stanley Cup in 1994, to bringing U2’s Bono down to earth with a curt, “Boner who?” Rafe’s book is titled: Two and Two: McSorley’s, My Dad, and Me, and it’s as an heir…

David Osborne – The Coming

June 19, 2017 – This week, our time machine joins up with legendary explorers Lewis and Clark, and traces the clash of cultures between the Europeans and Native American Nez Perce tribe through William Clark’s son, Daytime Smoke. Our guide on this journey is David Osborne, who shares his ambitious debut novel, The Coming. David has five nonfiction books to his credit, and you’ve seen his work in the Atlantic, New York Times Magazine, Harper’s, and many other places popular opinion writing is found. He is also a senior fellow at the Progressive Policy Institute, directing the Reinventing America’s Schools Project. Find him on Twitter at Osborne David.           Podcast: Download (Duration: 42:40 — 97.7MB)Subscribe: iTunes | Android | RSS | More

John R. Bohrer – The Revolution of Robert Kennedy: From Power to Protest After JFK
Memoir /

June 12, 2017 – This week, we’ll visit the turbulent 1960s after President John F. Kennedy’s assassination. Once there, we’ll witness his younger brother and attorney general, Robert F. Kennedy, charting his own political path forward. With his foe LBJ in the White House, and only 38 years old, Bobby no longer has JFK’s career to put first, but his own. Our guide on this journey of discovery is reporter, historian, and television news producer John R. Bohrer, who’s here to share his book: The Revolution of Robert Kennedy – From Power to Protest After JFK. You can follow him on Twitter @JRBOH, or visit JohnRBorher.com.     Podcast: Download (Duration: 48:12 — 110.3MB)Subscribe: iTunes | Android | RSS | More

Tim Brady – His Father’s Son: The Life of General Ted Roosevelt, Jr.

June 5, 2017 – This day after this episode airs is June 6th, the anniversary of the D-Day landings in 1944. This week, our time machine hits those bloody beaches of Normandy, where we’ll meet the oldest man and highest-ranking officer to go ashore with the first wave: General Ted Roosevelt, Jr. As the oldest son of President Theodore Roosevelt, Ted had the name, the looks, the expectations — and the pressure that literally gave him headaches as a young man. So how did Ted avoid the pitfalls of that upbringing, to attain success in business, laurels in the First World War, and that crowning moment on D-Day, actions which earned him the Congressional Medal of Honor? Here to introduce us to the younger Theodore Roosevelt is Tim Brady, author of His Father’s Son: The Life of General Ted Roosevelt, Jr. Tim Brady is a Peabody Award-winning writer whose works include Twelve Desperate Miles and A Death in San Pietro. He has written a number of PBS documentaries, and helped develop the series Liberty! The American Revolution. Check out his author pages at Amazon and Penguin Random House.       Podcast: Download (Duration: 48:13 — 110.4MB)Subscribe: iTunes | Android…