H5F: Doris Kearns Goodwin – The Bully Pulpit

July 29, 2016 – Today we’re going to hear from popular historian and frequent TV news guest, Doris Kearns Goodwin. Her latest book is, The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism. She previously touched on the extended Roosevelt family twenty years ago, writing No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: The Home Front During World War II, for which she was awarded the 1995 Pulitzer Prize for History. The New York Times, Washington Post, Economist, Time, USA Today, Christian Science Monitor, and others named The Bully Pulpit as One of the Best Books of the Year, and the Associated Press said it’s “a tale so gripping that one questions the need for fiction when real life is so plump with drama and intrigue.” Remember to subscribe to the History Author Show on iTunes, like our iHeartRadio page, or make us appointment listening on your Android device, so you don’t miss an installment of History in Five Friday.   It’s the perfect way to kick off your modern weekend… with people from the past.       Podcast: Download (Duration: 6:20 — 5.8MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

CWW: Death Does Not Concern Us

July 27, 2016 – It’s Classical Wisdom Wednesday, presented by Classical Wisdom Weekly– bringing ancient wisdom to modern minds, every Wednesday morning before your first cup of coffee. The subject of death has been a source of fascination, and unease, for philosophers and religious seekers for centuries. How exactly should we feel about our deaths? Should it be a source of concern? Should we fear it? If you were to ask the ancient Roman, Lucretius, his answer would probably be a resounding… “eh”. Death, Lucretius says, does not concern us. Today we find out why. Your guide through the classical landscape is Van Bryan, Associate Editor of Classical Wisdom Weekly. You can catch Classical Wisdom Wednesday every week before your first cup of coffee, right here on the History Author Show. Podcast: Download (Duration: 8:13 — 7.5MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

Hildegarde Mahoney – Journey Interrupted: A Family Without a Country in a World at War

July 25, 1016 – This week, Hildegarde Mahoney shares her memoir, Journey Interrupted: A Family Without a Country in a World at War. In 1941, seven-year-old Hillie and her family left home in New York City and set off for their native Germany. They planned to take the safe and scenic route: Across the U.S., the Pacific, and Eurasia via the Trans-Siberian Railway. But then Hitler betrayed his alliance with Stalin, the family found themselves stranded in Yokohama, Japan — and when the empire attacked Pearl Harbor, there was no going back. Today, Hildegarde Mahoney has worn many hats in her life — and one crown. She was Miss Rheingold, 1956. Today, she is the chairman of the Harvard Mahoney Neuroscience Institute. You can sign up for their free, quarterly newsletter right here, and be on the cutting edge of brain science when you or someone you love is impacted. As Mrs. Mahoney says, “No family goes untouched.”         Podcast: Download (Duration: 39:56 — 36.6MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

H5F: James Shapiro – Henry Clay Folger: History’s Biggest Shakespeare Fan

July 22, 2016 – It’s History in Five Friday, presented by Simon & Schuster — kicking off your modern weekend, with people from the past. Today, we meet lifelong Shakespeare fan, industrialist Henry Clay Folger, who founded the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington D.C. to serve as the leading western research and education center on the famous playwright. We have a familiar passenger in our time machine: James Shapiro, Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. He’s the author of Contested Will: Who Wrote Shakespeare, and The Year of Lear: Shakespeare in 1606. You can hear our interview (recorded in the shadow of Shakespeare’s Central Park statue), wherever you enjoy our show. History in Five Friday. It’s the perfect way to kick off your modern weekend… with people from the past. Podcast: Download (Duration: 2:08 — 2.0MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

CWW: Roman Concrete: a Forgotten Stroke of Genius

It’s Classical Wisdom Wednesday, presented by Classical Wisdom Weekly– bringing ancient wisdom to modern minds, every Wednesday morning before your first cup of coffee. Have you ever wondered just how all those ancient Roman buildings are still standing even after thousands of years of wars, earthquakes, erosion, and encroaching modernity? Well, the secret to the durability of ancient Roman architecture is now out, and you won’t believe the findings. Your guide through the classical landscape is Van Bryan, Associate Editor of Classical Wisdom Weekly. You can catch Classical Wisdom Wednesday every week before your first cup of coffee, right here on the History Author Show. Podcast: Download (Duration: 7:08 — 6.5MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

Jack Kelly – Heaven’s Ditch: God, Gold, and Murder on the Erie Canal

July 18, 2016 – This week, we strapping our time machine to a canal boat, and sail down the modern marvel of early American commerce: The Erie Canal. The 360-mile slash between Lake Erie to Albany, and down the Hudson River to New York Harbor isn’t just one of engineers and back-breaking, dangerous manual labor, but of fascinating human drama and America itself. The book is Heaven’s Ditch: God, Gold, and Murder on the Erie Canal. By the time the canal opened 1825, the nation had fallen in love with this man-made waterway. Now, you can fall in love with it, too, thanks to Jack Kelly — journalist, novelist, and New York Foundation for the Arts fellow. His previous books include Band of Giants, which earned the Daughters of the American Revolution’s History Award Medal. You can see him everywhere from the Wall Street Journal to the History Channel, or by clicking over to HeavensDitch.com.     Podcast: Download (Duration: 39:26 — 36.1MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

H5F: T.H. Breen – George Washington’s Journey

July 15, 2016 – It’s History in Five Friday, presented by Simon & Schuster. Check them out at Facebook.com/HistoryInFive. Today, author Timothy H. Breen hits the road to trace the route of our first president. His book is George Washington’s Journey: The President Forges a New Nation. Aware of the fragile and fractured nature of the new republic after independence, Washington resolves — in a day without maps or roads worthy of the name — to take the federal government to the people. And he stays not in the finest homes, but simple inns. You can enjoy the interview on George Washington’s Journey whenever you enjoy our show, or stream it at HistoryAuthor.com. Mr. Breen can be found on Twitter @TimothyHBreen. History in Five Friday. It’s the perfect way to kick off your modern weekend… with people from the past. Podcast: Download (Duration: 3:34 — 3.3MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

David Beardsley – The Journey Back To Where You Are: Homer’s Odyssey as a Spiritual Quest

July 13, 2016 – Classical Wisdom Weekly — bringing you ancient wisdom for modern minds — joins us for this special episode. Van Bryan, Associate Editor of CWW, sits down with David Beardsley, author of The Journey Back To Where You Are: Homer’s Odyssey as a Spiritual Quest. It’s a unique book that seeks to reclaim the allegorical power of Homer’s masterpiece that was so important to the Classical Age.     Podcast: Download (Duration: 32:32 — 29.8MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

Roger Boas – Battle Rattle: A Last Memoir of World War Two

July 11, 2016 – Today, we travel back in time to World War Two, and hear from a veteran who served on the front lines. Our guest is Roger Boas, and his book is Battle Rattle: A Last Memoir of World War II. It focuses not only on the fighting, but the scars it left on the inside. Roger Boas was born in San Francisco, 1921, so he’s just five years from celebrating his centennial. That long life — denied so many of his generation — has given him time to reflect on the meaning of his four years in uniform, including eleven months fighting in Europe as a field artillery forward observer with Gen. George S. Patton’s Fourth Armored Division. For his service, Roger Boas earned both a Silver Star and a Bronze Star. And raised a Christian Scientist but of Jewish ancestry, he was among the first American soldiers to find and enter a Nazi concentration camp. Experiencing so much brutality left scars on the young Roger Boas. The result, is what we today call Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). But in the Second World War they called it, “battle rattle.” For more of Roger Boas discussing his experiences,…

David O. Stewart on American Emperor – Aaron Burr: The Man Who Shot Alexander Hamilton

July 8, 2016 – On Monday, July 11, 2016, we’ll commemorate the tragic death of one Founding Father — Alexander Hamilton — at the hands of another, Vice President Aaron Burr. With “Hamilton: An American Musical” racking up Tonys on Broadway, the face on the $10 bill is more popular than he has been in 200 years. But in this episode, David O. Stewart introduces us to the man who pulled the trigger. Mr. Stewart is president of the Washington Independent Review of Books and author of American Emperor: Aaron Burr’s Challenge to Jefferson’s America. And since we are looking ahead to the 212th anniversary of the Burr-Hamilton Duel, those of us in the Greater New York City area won’t want to miss the annual gathering at the Hamilton Memorial overlooking the Weehawken Dueling Grounds in New Jersey, just across the Hudson from Manhattan. The Alexander Hamilton Awareness Society (AHA!) will commemorate the event at 6PM, with the theme of Celebrating the New Generation of U.S. Currency. Douglas Hamilton, 5th great-grandson of Alexander, will speak at the Hamilton Memorial Bust, a year after his successful call to preserve Alexander’s place of honor on the $10 bill. If you can’t get enough of…