Good Friday! It’s Eastern Orthodox Easter

April 29, 2016 – This weekend, the Greek and Eastern Orthodox Churches take us back in time to the early days of the church, when Christ’s resurrection was celebrated after Passover in order to be historically sequential. After all, the Last Supper was a Passover Seder — which some of you might have celebrated a few days ago. This special episode is presented by Luke Historians, and features excerpts from Dan Arsenault’s lectures on “Messiah Factor” and “Is Jesus the Messiah?” Additional information on the dating of the crucifixion is well-sourced and compiled in James D. Agresti’s book, Rational Conclusions. Podcast: Download (Duration: 11:31 — 10.5MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

CWW: Socrates – Life of a Gadfly

April 27, 2016 – It’s Classical Wisdom Wednesday, presented by Classical Wisdom Weekly — bringing ancient wisdom to modern minds, every Wednesday morning before your first cup of coffee. Today we are looking at a true giant from the classical age. He is a man who so popularized a method of inquiry, that it bears his very name. He is a man we are all indebted to; we are all students of this great and unusual man-Socrates. Your guide through the classical landscape is Van Bryan, Associate Editor of Classical Wisdom Weekly. You can catch Classical Wisdom Wednesday every week before your first cup of coffee, right here on the History Author Show. Podcast: Download (Duration: 7:39 — 7.0MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

Daniel L. Mallock – Agony and Eloquence

April 25, 2016 – In this episode, we’ll step through the Guardian of Forever and meet two founding fathers who were best friends, then bitter enemies, and finally friends again: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, the second and third presidents of the United States, and the first and second vice presidents. Our guide on this journey is Daniel L. Mallock, and his book is Agony and Eloquence: John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and a World of Revolution. Daniel L. Mallock grew up within walking distance of Peacefield, John and Abigail Adams’ home in Massachusetts, and was also a member of the Quincy Historical Society in the Bay State. You may have seen his previous history work in North and South. But if not, check out his website: DanielMallock.com. And if you’re going to be in the New England area this summer, catch Dan at Bunker Hill Day, June 17, 2016, where he’ll speak about “John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and the Other Revolution” at the Adams National Historic Park in Quincy, Massachusetts.     Podcast: Download (Duration: 58:10 — 53.3MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

H5F: Doris Kearns Goodwin – Theodore Roosevelt’s “Wild” Fitness Regime

April 22, 2016 – Today popular historian and frequent TV news guest, Doris Kearns Goodwin discusses how Theodore Roosevelt overcame serious ailments as a child to become one of our nation’s most active, vigorous presidents. The insight comes in her latest book, titled, The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism. She previously touched on the extended Roosevelt family twenty years ago, writing No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: The Home Front During World War II, for which she was awarded the 1995 Pulitzer Prize for History. You can follow her @DorisKGoodwin on Twitter. Remember to subscribe to the History Author Show on iTunes, like our iHeartRadio page, or make us appointment listening on your Android device, so you don’t miss an installment of History in Five Friday. It’s the perfect way to kick off your modern weekend… with people from the past. Podcast: Download (Duration: 3:19 — 3.0MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

CWW: Who Was The Real Homer?

April 20, 2016 – It’s Classical Wisdom Wednesday, presented by Classical Wisdom Weekly — bringing ancient wisdom to modern minds, every Wednesday morning before your first cup of coffee. You have probably heard the name “Homer” (the classical Greek, not Simpson). He is a man that we are culturally and literarily so indebted to that his epics The Iliad and The Odyssey are often considered the first true masterpieces of the Western world. But there are so many questions about this mysterious author. Did he write? Or was he a traveling bard? Was he really only one man? Could he possibly have been a woman? Most interestingly of all, did he even really exist? Your guide through the classical landscape is Van Bryan, Associate Editor of Classical Wisdom Weekly. You can catch Classical Wisdom Wednesday every week before your first cup of coffee, right here on the History Author Show. Podcast: Download (Duration: 5:30 — 5.0MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

Eric Nelsen – The Kearney House

April 18, 2016 – Today, we’re traveling back in time by rappelling down the steep face of New Jersey’s Palisades Cliffs, and down to the Alpine Boat Basin, just north of the George Washington Bridge. Our destination is the historic The Kearney House, formerly called the Cornwallis Headquarters, based on the local legend that the British general stopped here for a night during the American Revolution. The Kearney House dates back to the mid-1700s, and in the centuries since has been a home, a riverfront tavern, a police station, and a shrine to history itself — surviving not only time and development, but Superstorm Sandy. You can tour The Kearney House, but also enjoy special events such as Punch & Pie Tavern Nights (April 23 and April 30, 2016) and Tales of the Macabre with readings from local fellow, Edgar Alan Poe. With music, mirth and libations, this is hardly your typical velvet-rope historical experience. Our guide on this visit is Eric Nelsen, historic interpreter for the Palisades Interstate Park and co-author of the book about this 100,000 acres of open space: New Jersey’s Palisades Interstate Park. You can check out what’s happening at The Kearney House and the park’s…

H5F: Fergus Bordewich – The First Congress

April 15, 2016 – It’s History in Five Friday, presented by Simon & Schuster. Our guest is Fergus Bordewich , and his book is, The First Congress: How James Madison, George Washington, and a Group of Extraordinary Men Invented the Government. It’s the monumental story of the most productive Congress in US history, in 1789–1791, which we first explored with Fergus in our recent interview, which you can still find at HistoryAuthor.com, iTunes, iHeartRadio, or wherever you’re listening. Mr. Fergus Bordewich is the author of six previous books including, America’s Great Debate — Henry Clay, Stephen A. Douglas, and The Compromise that Preserved the Union, Washington: The Making of the American Capital, and Bound for Canaan: The Underground Railroad and the War for the Soul of America. You learn more about these and his other titles at FergusBordewich.com. Simon & Schuster’s History in Five Friday. It’s the perfect way to kick off your modern weekend…with people from the past. Podcast: Download (Duration: 4:09 — 3.8MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

CWW: Cicero – Defender of the Republic

April 13, 2016 – It’s Classical Wisdom Wednesday, presented by Classical Wisdom Weekly — bringing ancient wisdom to modern minds, every Wednesday morning before your first cup of coffee. Cicero is remembered for posterity as a great orator and an influential philosopher. However, he was also a cunning politician and perhaps the staunchest defender of the Roman Republic. Today we look at Cicero’s time as Roman Consul, the highest elected office of the Roman world. Your guide through the classical landscape is Van Bryan, Associate Editor of Classical Wisdom Weekly. You can catch Classical Wisdom Wednesday every week before your first cup of coffee, right here on the History Author Show.           Podcast: Download (Duration: 7:35 — 6.9MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

Mark Braude – Making Monte Carlo

April 11, 2016 – Today, our time machine will wend its way through the tight mountain passes of Southern France, and across the blue seas of the Mediterranean to the principality of Monaco. Yes, Monaco. The name itself conjures up images of glamour and gambling, of royalty and race cars. But how did it get that way? It’s about half the size of Central Park, the second-tiniest nation in the world. Yet it’s played a big role as a destination of gambling and vice for the world’s rich and famous. Dealing the cards today is Mark Braude, who sends us on our way with his debut book: Making Monte Carlo: A History of Speculation and Spectacle. Mark is a lecturer in history at Stanford University, having earned a Ph. D. in Modern European History from the University of Southern California, as well as a Masters in French Studies from our own New York University. You can follow him @MarkBraude on Twitter. Podcast: Download (Duration: 41:25 — 37.9MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

H5F: Jonathan Horn – The Man Who Would Not Be Washington

April 8, 2016 – It’s History in Five Friday, presented by Simon & Schuster — kicking off your modern weekend, with people from the past. Since tomorrow is the 151st anniversary of Robert E. Lee’s surrender to Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House, it’s fitting that today’s history author, former White House speech writer Jonathan Horn, introduces us to a family connection in Lee’s life that might be overlooked: President George Washington. Horn’s book is titled The Man Who Would Not Be Washington: Robert E. Lee’s Civil War and His Decision That Changed American History. This interesting story is a reminder of how close the Revolutionary War and Civil War generations were to each other. Keep up with Horn’s work at JonathanHornAuthor.com, and follow him on Twitter @JonathanDHorn. Simon & Schuster’s History in Five Friday. It’s the perfect way to kick off your modern weekend…with people from the past. Podcast: Download (Duration: 5:22 — 4.9MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More